How Long Does a Divorce Take in Washington?

Seattle Divorce Services How Long Does Divorce Take

When you are researching divorce, the last thing you want to do is waste a lot of time looking for what should be some quick answers. To make life easier for you, we’ve compiled a few of the most frequently asked questions and their answers here.

Q: What’s the divorce filing fee in Washington state?

A: It’s $290. That just covers the court fee to file the petition.

Q: How long does a divorce take in Washington State?

A: The minimum timeframe for a divorce or “dissolution of marriage” as it’s called is 90 days. The clock starts ticking when you and your spouse jointly file a Petition for Dissolution, or if you are filing, after you sign the Petition and serve notice on your spouse.

Most divorces take longer because there are disputes such division of property or debts, and children are involved. Other issues could delay the process.

In King County, a case schedule is issued when the Petition for Dissolution is filed with the court. The case schedule sets a trial date in eleven months. The majority of cases do not go to trial and are resolved by agreement, mediation or arbitration before the trial date.

Washington residents fare quite well when it comes to the length of time it takes to get a  divorce. It takes 360 days to get a divorce in California, but just a minimum of 62 in Idaho, for instance.

Q: Can same sex couples who are married get divorced in Washington?

A: Yes, because same-sex marriages are now legal and recognized in Washington, same sex couples can get divorced as well. They follow the same procedures as opposite sex couples do when they divorce.

Q: Do I have to be separated before I can get a divorce in Washington?

A: No, there is no legal separation required or waiting period to get a divorce in this state.

Q: Is a parenting plan required if I have children and am getting a divorce?

A: Yes, Washington State law requires that you create a parenting plan before your divorce is final. You are also required to go to a parenting class.

 

If you’d like to see how Washington State divorces and timeframes compare to other states, check out Find the Data, which has compiled this information.

Do you have any questions about divorce that we can answer for you? We’d love to help. Talk to us in the comments below.